Archive for the ‘Length: 0 – 3 miles’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Addebury Circular

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  • Start – 2.7 miles from Bloxham
  • Length of walk – 2.8 miles (4.5 km)
  • Fairly flat
  • Dog – friendly

Introduction

The walk starts at the village green, heads off towards Bodicote and then to the end of Bloxham Grove before heading back to Adderbury.

Adderbury is about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Banbury and 9 miles (14 km) from Junction 10 of the M40 motorway. The Sor Brook divides the village in two and each part has its own green and manor house.

GPS Data and route instructions

Waypoint N E
Route
AddC_01 52.0197 -0.3126
Start at the village green. Head for the hairdresser’s shop and along Croft lane
AddC_02 52.0198 -0.3132
As the lane opens into a field head NW across scrub.1
AddC_03 52.0207 -0.3161
Stay on the path through a gateway and along ther edge of the field.
AddC_04 52.0252 -0.3185
Turn left through a kissing gate and head diagonally right to a gate in ther corner of the field
AddC_05 52.0283 -0.3224
Through the gate, along the field edg. Just past a wide gap in the hedge head diagonally NW downhill.
AddC_06 52.0286 -0.3229
Go through a gap in the hedge (across a plank bridge) then turn left and follow the ditch as it turns the corner, then turn left to cross over it and immediately right to go along a grass track.
AddC_07 52.0295 -0.3248
Go through a gate and turn left. field towards the small building near Lower Grove Mill.
AddC_08 52.0290 -0.3263
Head past a reservoir (on your right), turn left onto a wide track, over the bridge and between the buildings and through a field gate.
AddC_09 52.0281 -0.3271
Along the field edge track, through a gate ato where you can see the windmill Bloxham Church in the distance.
AddC_10 52.0270 -0.3338
Turn left at the track junction and go down the tree lined avenue.
AddC_11 52.0255 -0.3341
See views of Adderbury Church in the distance on your left. Follow the path diagonally SE, up a slope, across the centre of a field and over a stile.
AddC_12 52.0213 -0.3319
Cross the next field, through a woodland strip down to a gate with a stile to its left.
AddC_13 52.0196 -0.3292
Over the stile, across the meadow and through a kissing gate.
AddC_14 52.0168 -0.3273
Cross the Sor Brook via the footbridge and a gate.
AddC_15 52.0158 -0.3261
Turn right and head uphill, then through a gate between two stone walls and along the alleyway into Manor
Road.
AddC_16 52.0159 -0.3216
Turn left and head down Manor Rd back towards the village green.
AddC_17 52.0161 -0.3192
AddC_18 52.0169 -0.3122

 

Google Maps

Click here for a google map of the walk.

You can get an online OS map here.

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PostHeaderIcon Barfords Circular

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  • Start: 2.2 miles from Bloxham
  • Length of walk: 2.25 miles  (3.6 km )
  • Fairly flat
  • Dog friendly but  farm animals on outward route

This walk commences in Barford St Michael whichis is a village on the south bank of the River Swere. Barford probably means barley ford – a place to cross the river at harvest time. In 1086 it was known as Bereford, and by around 1250 as Bereford Sancti Michaelis. Barford

The village has an attractive church which may be worth a visit before the walk. Some of the church is Norman but much of the rest was rebuilt in the 13th century in the Early English style

The second half of the walk runs alongside a disused airfield: RAF Barford St John’s .
The airfield was opened in World War 2 as training facility used primarily by the Flying Training School from RAF Kidlington. It was later modified for use by RAF Upper Heyford and Bomber Command flew Wellington bombers and Mosquitoes from there .
In 1943 it was used for test flights of the first jet, the Gloucester Whittle, and it’s successor the Meteor. The airfield was mothballed in 1946 but has subsequently assumed a role in government communications as evidenced by the many aerials dotted across it.

GPS Data

Waypoint N E N degrees N Minutes W degrees W Minutes
BarfordSJ 01 51.995292 -1.36371 51 59.71752 1 21.8226
BarfordSJ 02 51.994553 -1.353765 51 59.67318 1 21.2259
BarfordSJ 03 51.99524 -1.344023 51 59.7144 1 20.64138
BarfordSJ 04 52.000068 -1.345289 52 0.00408 1 20.71734
BarfordSJ 05 52.000035 -1.3452575 52 0.0021 1 20.71545
BarfordSJ 06 51.999692 -1.348143 51 59.98152 1 20.88858
BarfordSJ 07 51.998879 -1.352005 51 59.93274 1 21.1203
BarfordSJ 08 51.997591 -1.354687 51 59.85546 1 21.28122
BarfordSJ 09 51.998833 -1.359687 51 59.92998 1 21.58122
BarfordSJ 10 51.99849 -1.362648 51 59.9094 1 21.75888

Route Description

  1. Start – straight along farm road.
  2. Dilapidated farm cottage and pond.
  3. Keep heading towards the big farmhouse and then turn left (North) to pass through a field along the bottom of a hill on which the farmhouse stands.
  4. Leave the field via a cronky wooden gate! You can go wrong here! Don’t follow the main footpath North. Turn left and pass through another gate just 20m or so away.
  5. Now head more or less west along the side of the field with a ariels on your right.
  6. Keep going basically west.
  7. Keep going basically west.
  8. The pathway bends slightly northwards here.
  9. Arrive at a gate to your left and head through this to the road.
  10. Turn left and head back to the starting point along the road.

Google maps

Click here for a Google satellite map of this walk.

Ordnance survey maps

You need OS Map 191
You can get an online OS map here.

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PostHeaderIcon Bloxham – Broughton – Wykham Mill Circular



  • Start: within Bloxham – Courtington Lane
  • Length of walk: 4.3 miles (6.9km)
  • Steep hill- Can avoid by starting along Ells lane instead of up Hobb Hill.
  • Dog hostile – stiles from Ells Lane to Broughton impossible for large dogs.

Introduction

Hobb Hill offers a panoramic view of Bloxham. In the snow it is a mass of slithering humanity utilising gravity assisted motion on sleds, trays and polythene bags!
Broughton is the site of Broughton Castle but this is not directly on the route.
There are historical references to Robert de Wykeham, mill owner, around 1218. The Mill would have been powered by the waters of the Sor Brook.
More recently the Wykham Mill Buildings has been the site of manufacture of the Jaguar XJ220 and then subsequently the Aston Martin DB7 from 1994 – 2004.

GPS Data and Route

Waypoint N E Route
WM01 52.022078 -1.377325

Walk down the alley at the footpath next to the playing fields in Courtington Lane.

WM02 52.023716 -1.37857 Head straight up Hobb Hill alongside the hedge on the right. Enjoy the view of Bloxham from the top!
WM03 52.026779 -1.381788 Basically just keep going alongside the hedge until you find yourself near the left of a new field. Follow this to Ells lane opposite Ells farm
WM04 52.028522 -1.38299 Turn left and walk along Ells lane until you see a footpath sign on the right heading North- take this.
WM05 52.031505 -1.383548 After a short time the footpath bends NW across some tricky stiles.
WM06 52.03235 -1.385994 Take the right edge of the field when you get near Castle farm and carry on to meet the main road through Broughton village.
WM07 52.035914 -1.387968 Turn right and head into the village until you reach Wykham Lane where you again turn right.
WM08 52.039161 -1.390929 Head up the lane and out of the village.
WM09 52.0432 -1.387496 At Rectory Farm – just outside the village go along the driveway immediately before the farm to pick up a footpath heading SE to Broughton Grange.
WM10 52.042936 -1.380672 Follow the path around Broughton Grange and on past Wykham Mill onto the A361.
WM11 52.040138 -1.377926 Turn right and head up the A316
WM12 52.038053 -1.374321  
WM13 52.03433 -1.364965  
WM14 52.022158 -1.377153 Arrive back at the start in Courtington Lane.

 

Google Map

Click here for a Google satellite view of this walk.

Ordnance survey maps

You need OS Map 191
You can get an online OS map here.

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PostHeaderIcon Great Tew Circular 1

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  • Start: 5.4 miles from Bloxham
  • Length of walk: 2.9 miles (4.7km)
  • Mostly flat
  • Dog friendly

This information is mainly drawn from Wikipedia:
Evidence of early settlement include a Bronze Age barrow and Roman mosaic floors from the 3C.
The village was founded in Anglo-Saxon times and its ownership was linked to St Albans Abbey
Unlike neighbouring Lttle Tew it had its own church and in Old English Cyrictiwa means “Church Tew
William the Conqueror granted the manor to his step-brother and it is recorded amongst Odo’s estates in the Domesday Book. The present parish church dates back to Norman times but has been substantially rebuilt since then.
The cottages and houses, mostly thatched , date back to the 17C and are built from the local ironstone from the Great Tew quarry.
In the late 1700s the estate was bought by George Stratton, who had made a fortune in the East India Company. He had the dilapidated manor house demolished and engaged garden designer John Loudon who contributed much to the delightful appearance of the village and of Great Tew Park.
In 1815-1816 the son of the Birmingham manufacturer Matthew Boulton bought the Great Tew estate. Innovations in the middle of the 19C included a saw-mill powered by a beam engine of which the engine house and tall chimney still survive.
In 1914 the family died without heirs and for fifty years its properties became unoccupied and derelict.
In 1962 Major Eustace Robb inherited the estate and declared he would restore its prosperity but little improvement was seen but its subsequent owners, the Johnson family, have worked hard to restore the village.

GPS Data

Waypoint N E N degrees N Minutes W degrees W Minutes
GT01 51.96149 -1.426404 51 57.6894 1 25.58424
GT02 51.960716 -1.424897 51 57.64296 1 25.49382
GT03 51.961126 -1.417387 51 57.66756 1 25.04322
GT04 51.961853 -1.407666 51 57.71118 1 24.45996
GT05 51.961219 -1.406121 51 57.67314 1 24.36726
GT06 51.959368 -1.404018 51 57.56208 1 24.24108
GT07 51.958402 -1.403396 51 57.50412 1 24.20376
GT08 51.955004 -1.399577 51 57.30024 1 23.97462
GT09 51.953073 -1.399941 51 57.18438 1 23.99646
GT10 51.955087 -1.417781 51 57.30522 1 25.06686
GT11 51.955348 -1.422504 51 57.32088 1 25.35024
GT12 51.961113 -1.425862 51 57.66678 1 25.55172

Route Description

  1. Start at the car-park. Turn Left down the lane then Right into Old Road near the post office.
  2. Turn left immediately after the pub and basically keep heading East
  3. Keep right on
  4. Care here – there are footpaths in 5 directions! You want the bridleway that is straight ahead.
  5. Follow the field around towards Hobbshole farm.
  6. Skirt the edge of Hobbshole farm.
  7. Keep to the bridleway
  8. Keep to the bridleway
  9. Arrive at the Gt Tew to Ledwell Road just outside Ledwell. Turn right to head West back towards Great Tew
  10. Keep going (West) You reach a junction where you can see the Manor House and ahead the local cricket ground.
  11. Turn right and head (N) along New Road . St Michael’s Church is to your right just a little way down. There is a small lane past the front of the Manor house if you want a small diversion before heading back to the car-park

Google Map

Click here to see a Google satellite map of this walk.

Ordnance survey maps

You need OS Map 191
You can get an online OS map here.

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PostHeaderIcon Grimsbury Reservoir Circular

  • Start:  4.6 miles from Bloxham
  • Length of walk: 1.5 miles (2.4km)
  • flat – as a pancake!
  • dog friendly
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Grimsbury Reservoir is a relatively small reservoir fed by the River Cherwell and owned by Thames Water and used both for water supply and sporting activities.
In the mid 1960s, when the reservoir was built the Banbury Ornithological Society negotiated  for a four hectare area to be set aside and developed as a wildlife sanctuary to address the potential importance of the area to birds .
A walk around two sides of the reservoir has been established  but this also links up with a pathway through a nature reserve and  the canal towpath . This walk takes in all three providing a short but varied exploration of the area.

GPS Data

Waypoint N E N degrees N Minutes W degrees W Minutes
Grm01 52.078537 -1.327172 52 4.71222 1 19.63032
Grm02 52.079938 -1.326829 52 4.79628 1 19.60974
Grm03 52.079294 -1.330604 52 4.75764 1 19.83624
Grm04 52.078495 -1.335519 52 4.7097 1 20.13114
Grm05 52.076504 -1.336365 52 4.59024 1 20.1819
Grm06 52.073557 -1.336788 52 4.41342 1 20.20728
Grm07 52.072156 -1.333891 52 4.32936 1 20.03346
Grm01 52.078537 -1.327172 52 4.71222 1 19.63032

Route Description

This is a very simple route.

  1. Follow the signs to Grimsbury Reservoir off Hennef Way, Banbury.
  2. Park in the car-park adjacent to the entry to the waterworks.
  3. Enter the road to the reservoir and Banbury sailing club.
  4. Follow the pathway to the right of the reservoir until you reach a wooded conservation area.
  5. Take the pathway through these woods.
  6. At the end of this path you can turn left back to a walk down the other side of the resrvoir or else turn right onto the canal towpath. Take the towpath.
  7. Continue down the towpath and when you arrive back at the Waterworks cross a stream to arrive on a road back to the car-park.

GoogleMaps

Click here for a Google satellite map of this walk. (Awaited!)

Ordnance survey maps

You need OS Map 191
You can get an online OS map here.

os191
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PostHeaderIcon Nether Worton Circular

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  • Start: 4.1 miles from Bloxham
  • Length of walk:  2.25 miles    (3.6 km )
  • Gentle slopes
  • Dog friendly except for one stile!

This is a circular walk of 3.6k starting from Nether Worton (6 km. west of Deddington and 15 km. south of Banbury) passing through Over Worton. There is one part that dogs cannot negotiate without being lifted!

Worton derives from the Anglo-Saxon (Ortune) a settlement by a bank or slope,and probably applied to Over Worton as Nether Worton lies in a flat valley beside a small tributary of the Cherwell.
It consists of a tiny church, a few cottages, Manor Farm, and Nether Worton House.
The walk heads up to Over Worton where there is a photogenic church and then back down past some small lakes to return past tiny Nether Worton church.

GPS Data

Waypoint N E N degrees N Minutes W degrees W Minutes
NW1 51.968252 -1.382647 51 58.09512 1 22.95882
NW2 51.967248 -1.38579 51 58.03488 1 23.1474
NW3 51.965106 -1.385211 51 57.90636 1 23.11266
NW4 51.963493 -1.388826 51 57.80958 1 23.32956
NW5 51.957609 -1.390425 51 57.45654 1 23.4255
NW6 51.957688 -1.385458 51 57.46128 1 23.12748
NW7 51.958462 -1.381767 51 57.50772 1 22.90602
NW8 51.958872 -1.378698 51 57.53232 1 22.72188
NW9 51.959189 -1.375383 51 57.55134 1 22.52298
NW10 51.960068 -1.374954 51 57.60408 1 22.49724
NW11 51.962244 -1.376145 51 57.73464 1 22.5687
NW12 51.96576 -1.380082 51 57.9456 1 22.80492
NW13 51.967684 -1.380125 51 58.06104 1 22.8075

Route Description

  1. Start near the Manor House.  Walk along the road towards Sandford to a stile on your left.
  2. Cross the stile and head to a gate. Through the gate and across the field .
  3. Through the gate and turn diagonally right towards the corner of the next field towards a road
  4. At the road turn left (South) and head to past Flighthill farm on your right.
  5. Turn left and head up the footpath past the farm cottage and through various gates / stiles
  6. Pass through the copse.
  7. Along the edge of the next field.
  8. Into another small copse. This is hard to get out of with a heavy dog!!
  9. Along the field past some posh houses on the left. Out onto a road in Over Worton Follow the church sign.
  10. Through the churchyard through a gate with limited opening! Down the field.
  11. Keep going. Cross 2 stiles cutting off the corner of a field.
  12. You should see Nether Worton Manor farm coming into view.
  13. Arrive at Manor farm with a church on your left. Turn left  back to the starting point.

Google Map

Click here for a Google satellite map of this walk.

Ordnance survey maps

You need OS Map 191
You can get an online OS map here.

os191
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